Art

Evaporation

One of the most common early challenges for a flame fractal artist is the "wispy clouds" issue. Fractal renders often look grainy, splotchy, or desaturated using default rendering settings. It takes some practice to learn where and how to use blurs, gamma adjustments, color curves and other smoothing techniques to fill space without muddying up the detail and structure of the design too much. When I started off, I'd often wonder if my renders would ever look as smooth and clean as some of the wizards I learned from. But look at me now, making silky smooth ribbons and bright, colorful shapes.

Evaporation

One of the most common early challenges for a flame fractal artist is the "wispy clouds" issue. Fractal renders often look grainy, splotchy, or desaturated using default rendering settings. It takes some practice to learn where and how to use blurs, gamma adjustments, color curves and other smoothing techniques to fill space without muddying up the detail and structure of the design too much. When I started off, I'd often wonder if my renders would ever look as smooth and clean as some of the wizards I learned from. But look at me now, making silky smooth ribbons and bright, colorful shapes.

One of the most common early challenges for a flame fractal artist is the "wispy clouds" issue. Fractal renders often look grainy, splotchy, or desaturated using default rendering settings. It takes some practice to learn where and how to use blurs, gamma adjustments, color curves and other smoothing techniques to fill space without muddying up the detail and structure of the design too much. When I started off, I'd often wonder if my renders would ever look as smooth and clean as some of the wizards I learned from. But look at me now, making silky smooth ribbons and bright, colorful shapes.