Art

Soul Server

One of the tough parts about the style of fractal art I do is knowing when to stop fiddling. As a design progresses, I reach spots where I think I might be ready for a render, but usually I'll continue to explore a bit beyond that. If I don't find anything appealing, I go back and render the last step that looked nice. Then I go into an image editor to clean up the colors. But sometimes once I'm looking at it up close in the image editor, I decide there's something I still want to change about the fractal. So I return, and try a different set of tweaks until I find something else interesting. I call these checkpoints "siblings", as they both come from the same predecessors. Some days, I just get stuck with a design that seems to have so much promise, but I can't quite settle what it needs to shine. This design, for example, has two older siblings that I rendered and polished up before deciding to try again. It was intimidating going back to the fractal for the third time expecting to find improvement, but once I coaxed out those shiny "people" shapes, this design took on a whole new feel. I found a color pallet that suited the new mood, and finally felt like my tinkering paid off.

Soul Server

One of the tough parts about the style of fractal art I do is knowing when to stop fiddling. As a design progresses, I reach spots where I think I might be ready for a render, but usually I'll continue to explore a bit beyond that. If I don't find anything appealing, I go back and render the last step that looked nice. Then I go into an image editor to clean up the colors. But sometimes once I'm looking at it up close in the image editor, I decide there's something I still want to change about the fractal. So I return, and try a different set of tweaks until I find something else interesting. I call these checkpoints "siblings", as they both come from the same predecessors. Some days, I just get stuck with a design that seems to have so much promise, but I can't quite settle what it needs to shine. This design, for example, has two older siblings that I rendered and polished up before deciding to try again. It was intimidating going back to the fractal for the third time expecting to find improvement, but once I coaxed out those shiny "people" shapes, this design took on a whole new feel. I found a color pallet that suited the new mood, and finally felt like my tinkering paid off.

One of the tough parts about the style of fractal art I do is knowing when to stop fiddling. As a design progresses, I reach spots where I think I might be ready for a render, but usually I'll continue to explore a bit beyond that. If I don't find anything appealing, I go back and render the last step that looked nice. Then I go into an image editor to clean up the colors. But sometimes once I'm looking at it up close in the image editor, I decide there's something I still want to change about the fractal. So I return, and try a different set of tweaks until I find something else interesting. I call these checkpoints "siblings", as they both come from the same predecessors. Some days, I just get stuck with a design that seems to have so much promise, but I can't quite settle what it needs to shine. This design, for example, has two older siblings that I rendered and polished up before deciding to try again. It was intimidating going back to the fractal for the third time expecting to find improvement, but once I coaxed out those shiny "people" shapes, this design took on a whole new feel. I found a color pallet that suited the new mood, and finally felt like my tinkering paid off.